Prosthodontic Rehabilitations

 

 
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Course duration

2 days.

Type

Theoretical-practical course

Maximum number of participants

20

Provided material

Detailed handout

Materials to bring

You will receive a detailed list of materials for hand-on-exercises

 

Rational preparation of natural teeth and the fabrication and relining of provisional restorations


The long-term success of a fixed prosthesis depends primarily on the proper execution of all clinical phases and techniques necessary for its fabrication and implementation. In this course, a few highlights of the clinical process will be analyzed: the preparation of the teeth and the relining of the provisional. The main purpose is to describe a routine and scientifically valid clinical practice which allows the participant to deal with these operational phases methodically and with confidence. Preparing a tooth for the fabrication of a crown is not just a manual task. The reduction of a natural abutment, as a matter of fact, must be consequent to the evaluation of the relationship that the tooth has with the surrounding tissues, with the other teeth of the same arch, the opposite arch and the entire stomatognathic unit. It is in this overall vision that the speaker will illustrate in a detailed manner the step by step preparation of the abutment and the instruments used. The preparation of the teeth should be followed by the application of proper temporary restorations. The temporary crowns and bridges are, in fact, an indispensable part of the prosthetic treatment to achieve a result of high quality in terms of both the esthetic appearance and the functional performance. The speakers will show how the temporaries should be manufactured so that they are easy to apply, promote tissue healing in the periodontal patients and help maintain the tissues healthy throughout the time that elapses until the cementation of the definitive prosthetic work.

  • THE PREPARATION OF NATURAL TEETH 

    The anatomical considerations that guide the preparation (the level of the gingival tissues, biologic width, level of the pulp).

    The mechanical principles (retention and resistance form, path of insertion, partial vs full preparations).

    The esthetic considerations (the thickness required for different dental restorations, the apico-coronal position of the prosthetic margin).

    The types of preparation (shoulder, chamfer, knife-edged): indications, advantages and disadvantages of each.

    The preparation technique.

  • THE PROVISIONAL PROSTHESIS 

    The functions of the provisional

    The materials that can be employed for the fabrication and intra-oral relining of the provisionals

    The types of provisionals: immediate vs custom made, hand made vs cad-cam, full resin vs metal-reinforced.

    The fabrication of a provisional shell: the step by step laboratory procedure and its application in the mouth.

  • HANDS-ON PRACTICAL WORKSHOPS

    1. Preparation of prosthetic teeth on a dentoform: anterior and posterior teeth, chamfer and shoulder margins for metal-ceramic and all ceramic crowns.

    2. Fabrication of a temporary shell and its application and finishing.



speaker-gracis 
Course duration

1 day.

Type

Theoretical course

Material included

Detailed handout

 

Impression materials and techniques for teeth and for implants:  
A comprehensive guide to the selections of the proper material and protocol 


To many professionals, final impression is a very stressful moment of the prosthetic work flow on which they believe they have little or no control. Every time that an impression is not satisfactory, often they do not know whether to blame the material or the technique. This course attempts to answer the following question: does a satisfactory impression depend more on the choice of an accurate material or on the utilization of a proper technique? 

  • The topics addressed are: 

    Types of impression materials available

    Detailed criteria for material selection

    Soft tissue retraction: methods and products

    Step-by-step impression technique for tooth-supported restorations

    Objectives and peculiarities of impression taking for implant-supported restorations

    Innovations in impression taking: the intraoral digital scanner – is it time to start using it?

 
 

speaker-gracis 
Course duration

Half day to 1 day, depending on the presence and number of practical exercises.

Type

Theoretical or theoretical-practical course, both for dentists and technicians

Material included

Detailed handout

 

Color selection in prosthodontics: art or science? A practical (but not necessarily technological) approach to understanding and communicating color


The choice of color for the fabrication of a prosthesis that has to be integrated into the mouth of a patient is certainly one of the more difficult tasks of the prosthodontist and dental technician. This course analyzes the causes of the discrepancies that so often frustrate our efforts intrying to achieve the “natural” effect and offers suggestions on how to get closer to the desired result.
 

  • The topics addressed are: 

    What is hue, chroma and value from a clinical point of view?

    Which is the fourth dimension of color?

    Which factors affect our ability to identify and record color?

    How do you avoid the pitfalls of color recording?

    Which are the shortcomings of shade guides?

    Are digital color recording devices helpful and reliable?

    What step by step system should be employed to identify the patient’s tooth color?



speaker-gracis 
Course duration

1 day.

Type

Theoretical course, both fort dentist and technicians.

Material included

Detailed handout

 

Material selection in fixed prosthodontics: metal-ceramics and all ceramic materials - traditional vs adhesive approaches 

Up to now, metal-ceramics has been considered the gold standard for fabricating fixed prosthesis since it reconciles excellent mechanical and physical properties with the ability to deliver, at least in many situations, good esthetics. In the last few years, the advent of new metal free ceramic materials and systems attempts to challenge this standard.
This course analyzes the indications and requirements for a metal-ceramic prosthesis vs. a metal free device and it will address their relative advantages, disadvantages and potential risks for failure.
A differentiation is made between situations where single crowns have to be fabricated and situations where bridges are needed. In the latter case, the comparison between metal-ceramics and zirconia points out the shortcomings of the traditional materials, but it also demonstrates the lack of sufficient data to justify, at this time, a widespread use of the new ceramics.
Certainly, the advent of CAD-CAM systems has started a revolution in prosthodontics that, eventually, will change radically the way both dentists and dental technicians work.



speaker-gracis 
Course duration

1 day for Part 1, Half day to 1 day for Part 2.

Type

Theoretical course

Material included

Detailed handout

 

The prosthetic rehabilitation of fully edentulous patients treated with implants: Fixed vs removable solutions 

The successful rehabilitation of fully edentulous patients who need a functional and esthetic prosthetic rehabilitation requires careful planning, effective communication among the members of the treating team, an in depth knowledge of the materials, and the application of clinically sound protocols for their fabrication and delivery. The aim of this course is to demonstrate in a structured and clinically relevant manner the protocols to achieve a naturally looking and well integrated restorations that can be long lasting. It illustrates the criteria for selecting the “best” restorative solution for the specific clinical case being treated (fixed vs removable), the concepts and strategies to be applied when treatment planning for and restoring implants, and the functional considerations and guidelines to be applied to make sure that esthetics and occlusion are two faces of the same coin and not disciplines in antagonism..

  • The main topics covered are: 

    Diagnostic approach to the edentulous patient to be treated with implants

    How do you identify whether a fixed or a removable solution has to be employed

    Technologies for manufacturing passive fitting prostheses

    How do you produce a model that is the exact replica of the clinical situation: impression techniques

    Screw-retained vs cement-retained solutions: indications, advantages and disadvantages



speaker-gracis 
Course duration

1 day.

Type

Theoretical course addressed to dentists

Material included

Detailed handout

 

Biomechanical and occlusal considerations for implant restorations:
how to design a functionally successful implant prosthesis 

This course analyzes some aspects of the planning and fabrication of an implant prostheses that may have a role in the longevity of the treatment. There are biomechanical variables such as the number and distribution of the implants, implant length, whether adjacent implants should be splinted or not, when cantilevers are acceptable and how long can they be. And, then, there are occlusal variables such as the width of the occlusal table, occlusal morphology, occlusal schemes for partially and for fully edentulous patients, the role of the antagonist dentition (full denture vs. natural dentition or implant “dentition”), and the response to dynamic and static forces. These topics are discussed from a clinical standpoint with the aim of giving the participant practical guidelines. At the same time, references to the published literature are made in order to draw conclusions that may be also as reliable as possible.



speaker-gracis 
Course duration

1 day.

Type

Theoretical course, both fort dentists and technicians

Material included

Detailed handout

 

The prosthetic rehabilitation of fully edentulous patients treated with implants:
Fixed vs removable solutions

The successful rehabilitation of fully edentulous patients who need a functional and esthetic prosthetic rehabilitation requires careful planning, effective communication among the members of the treating team, an in depth knowledge of the materials, and the application of clinically sound protocols for their fabrication and delivery. The aim of this course is to demonstrate in a structured and clinically relevant manner the protocols to achieve a naturally looking and well integrated restorations that can be long lasting. It illustrates the criteria for selecting the “best” restorative solution for the specific clinical case being treated (fixed vs removable), the concepts and strategies to be applied when treatment planning for and restoring implants, and the functional considerations and guidelines to be applied to make sure that esthetics and occlusion are two faces of the same coin and not disciplines in antagonism.

  • The main topics covered are: 

    Diagnostic approach to the edentulous patient to be treated with implants

    How do you identify whether a fixed or a removable solution has to be employed

    Technologies for manufacturing passive fitting prostheses

    How do you produce a model that is the exact replica of the clinical situation: impression techniques

    Screw-retained vs cement-retained solutions: indications, advantages and disadvantages